Health: The wild asparagus

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Asparagus is s spring vegetable that’s packed with nutrition. When you buy asparagus, either fresh from the farmers’ market or grocery store, it’s best to eat it right away. Asparagus pairs nicely with lots of other spring vegetables and flavors—think peas, garlic or new potatoes. 1 cup of cooked asparagus has 40 calories, 4 grams of protein, 4 grams of fiber and 404 milligrams of potassium. Potassium is good for blood pressure and asparagus also contains asparaptine, which helps improve blood flow and in turn helps lower blood pressure. If you need more reasons to enjoy this yummy vegetable read on to see some surprising reasons it’s so good for you. 

Asparagus is a very good source of fiber, folate, vitamins A, C, E and K, as well as chromium, a trace mineral that enhances the ability of insulin to transport glucose from the bloodstream into cells. That’s good news if you’re watching your blood sugar. 

Another anti-aging property of this delicious spring veggie is that it may help our brains fight cognitive decline. Like leafy greens, asparagus delivers folate, which works with vitamin B12—found in fish, poultry, meat and dairy—to help prevent cognitive impairment. In a study from Tufts University, older adults with healthy levels of folate and B12 performed better on a test of response speed and mental flexibility. (If you’re 50-plus, be sure you’re getting enough B12: your ability to absorb it decreases with age.)